Activity Photography – The Photo Agency Blog

Find tipps, tutorials, new projects of photoagency.one and more in this activity blog. You like to read more about our services? Take a look: Activity Photographer.

Black and white photography: camera, settings and light

Always some of the most dramatic photographs, black and white photography can be a tricky style to master. The monochrome color base can easily create a dull image that has little or nothing to catch the audience’s eye. However, when done right, black and white photography can capture a viewer in ways that most other […]

Sport Photography – Find the optimal objective

You’ve already taken care to adjust your ISO. You’ve opened up your aperture. You’ve pumped up your shutter speed as high as it will go. Unfortunately, all of this will be for nothing if you don’t get the proper equipment to pair with your newly-honed skills.

Tips and Tricks for Taking Perfect Pet Pictures

Many people love their pets just as much as their children. They want to capture those precious members of the family in film, keeping those memories alive forever. Animal photography, however, brings its own unique challenges!

Choosing the Perfect Background for Your Portrait

One of the biggest struggles of amateur portrait photographers is finding the perfect portrait background. You want something that is appropriate, compelling, but that won’t distract from your subject.

Camera settings: Depth of field

Depth of Field is a wildly variable term that shifts according to numerous settings with your device. However, in its essence, the depth of field of your shot is the area to the fore and back of your subject that remains in focus. In jargon parlance, depths of field can either be described as shallow, […]

7 Common Mistakes Made By Beginning Photographers

Everyone has to start somewhere when they begin their journey to becoming a successful photographer. Learning how to master a camera, frame the perfect shot, and work with your subject to get the picture you’re both looking for is a learning experience–and for many photographers, it’s one that occurs slowly.